Where to Cure Crepe Cravings in Chicago

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A person cuts into a strawberry crepe topped with whipped cream.
Holy crepe, Chicago.
Kim Kovacik/Eater Chicago

Enjoy the variety from sweet to savory, to French, Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese

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Holy crepe, Chicago.
| Kim Kovacik/Eater Chicago

Crepes, the endlessly versatile French specialty, is a deceptively simple creation that can take on a remarkable number of forms. The delicate pancake dish can be served sweet or savory; for breakfast, lunch, dinner, or dessert; on a plate at a sit-down restaurant, or in a cone for street-side munching. The crepe has a slew of international cousins like Chinese jianbing and South Asian dosa, and can be thoughtfully adapted for vegans and gluten-free diners.

That’s a lot to consider, so Eater Chicago is here to help. This map takes an expansive view of the crepe family tree, guiding locals and visitors through the city’s best creperies, crepe-centric cafes, and lesser-known crepe outposts around town.

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There are plenty of tempting stands inside the food court at Mitsuwa, the Chicago area’s premiere Japanese market in suburban Arlington Heights, including Japanese-style crepe specialist B-Bee Crepe & Umacha. Though Japanese crepes are strikingly similar to their French counterparts, the primary difference is presentation — in Japan, they’re rolled into cones and stuffed with sweets like pudding, whipped cream, Nutella, and ice cream. B-Bee’s menu includes flavors like taro, matcha, almond banana, and more.

A rare non-Filipino spot inside Seafood City, Serbian-owned Crepe House Cafe has carved out a niche with massive sweet and savory European crepes with distinctive cultural nods. Try the berry-loaded Queen Berry, which comes with a choice of Nutella or Eurocrem, a Serbian sweet chocolate spread; or the Bananarama, which is dusted with crumbled Plazma cookies, another Serbian favorite.

Jianbing, a Chinese cousin of the crepe and one of the country’s most popular street breakfast foods, has made its way to suburban Chicago. Previously located in Chinatown, Monkey King Jianbing recently moved to Skokie and brought with it a tight menu of crispy, savory pancakes that are grilled on a flat top, slathered in sauce, and filled with ingredients (think meat floss with beef hot dogs, fried shrimp, or crab stick with ham). The pancakes are then delicately rolled on the grill before chefs stab its center with a spatula and fold the whole thing in half.

A perpetually heaving breakfast destination in Little Village, La Catedral has in recent years expanded into a mini-empire with outposts in North Lawndale and Brighton Park. Owner Ambrocio “Bocho” González generally puts the spotlight on his vast and varied selection of chilaquiles, but regulars and fans know that toward the back of the menu lies a wonderland of sweet crepes, all served with powdered sugar and whipped cream. Highlights include dulce de leche with banana and strawberry mango.

A round white plate with a sweet strawberry Nutella crepe topped with whipped cream.
Sweet-toothed diners have lots of crepe options at La Catedral.
Kim Kovacik/Eater Chicago

Bixi Beer, named for the Chinese turtle serpent, counts several Asian influences on an eclectic menu. The rice crepe draws mostly Vietnamese influences and comes with a choice of mushrooms, pork, or shrimp. The quality of produce is what makes this version stick out and the veggies are always crisp and the herbs used in the nuoc cham make the sauce vibrant.

This indie coffeehouse is arguably best known for its empanadas — mainstays at owners Carmen Aguilar and Claudia Quiñonez’s respective households while growing up — but fans also rave about its indulgent crepes. Sweet varieties include banana or strawberry with Nutella, or customers can opt for a savory crepe stuffed with turkey, pesto, and mozzarella.

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Marlen Alchinov and Aigerim Mambetova, the spouses and owners behind this cozy cafe and bakery in Ravenswood, bring a Central Asian lilt to Chicago’s crepe scene — to great effect. The couple immigrated in 2013 from Kyrgyzstan and their roots are evident throughout the menu, including among its selection of sweet and savory crepes. Standouts include halal ground beef crepes with rice, cherry tomatoes, greens, and sour cream; and “classic crepes” slathered with condensed milk and strawberry jam made on-site.

Gluten-free diners don’t have to miss out on the fun of crepes at Bru, a cozy neighborhood cafe that specializes in rice crepes shaped into a cone and stuffed with ingredients like spicy beef, blue cheese with mushrooms, and banana with Nutella. The team has also added vegan options including tofu teriyaki and dairy-free strawberry Biscoff.

Originally founded in 1998 in Sparta, Greece, Iguana Cafe relocated to Chicago in 2000 and has proudly highlighted its European roots. The all-day spot goes so far as to feature different selections of sweet and savory crepes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Savory crepes are named after European locations or cities — think the Acropolis (feta, tomato, red onion) and the Berlin (turkey, provolone, onion, avocado). Sugary dessert crepes include a spin on a cannoli with chocolate chips and the Chocolate Delight with Nutella and Oreos.

Founded in 1972, local French favorite La Creperie is not only the granddaddy of Chicago crepe shops — its owners claim it’s the oldest restaurant of its kind in the U.S. The charming storefront spot has endured for various reasons, including its often-bustling beer garden, but most particularly due to its lengthy menu. Chicagoans continue to beat a path to its door for crepe hits like Boeuf bourguignon, fruits de mer with bechamel, and La Pomme, which features apples sautéed in butter and cinnamon.

As its name makes clear, it’s all crepes all the time at this Lakeview cafe that embraces classic, crowd-pleasing combinations. It’s hard to go wrong with its nostalgic lineup of delicate pancake treats, which range from Black Forest ham and fontina (mornay, dijon) and Fromage a Trois (fontina, mozzarella, mornay, parmesan crust) to cookie-inspired Biscoff and Matcha Made in Heaven (strawberries, mascarpone, jasmine, pistachios).

Jianbing finally hit Chicago’s hospitality scene in 2019 with the arrival of Jian inside the Chicago French Market. That’s where many locals encountered the Chinese crepes for the first time, gobbling up options like smoked bacon with avocado and cheddar, crawfish, and coconut butterfly shrimp. In late 2023, Jian opened a second outpost inside the Loop’s Block 37 mall.

Obelix’s weekday lunch and brunch menus contain a decadent crepe homard. The vegetables swimming in the buttery sauce change, but the main event is the poached lobster filling. It’s even better than it looks, and it looks pretty good.

This Chicago staple, with locations in the city and North Shore, is a throwback to the ‘70s with all-day breakfast vibes. There are two savory flavors with diced chicken breast or spinach, but the rest are filled with fruit. The nutty banana is reliable.

Dolo is one the finest restaurants in Chinatown, serving some of the city’s best dim sum. The traditional crepes come stuffed with shrimp, barbecue pork, beef, Japanese tofu, or pea spout and scrambled egg. It’s a very good version of the crepe with a slippery and chewy exterior.

This will start an argument. Is a dosa, the South Indian specialty, a crepe? Owner Ravi Nagubadi cringes when he reads the description. A dosa can be done in several ways, from paper thing crispy to fluffy. In between lies the possibility that dosas could be crepes. Art of Dosa inside Revival Food Hall deals with dosa fusion. The all-vegan spot uses Buffalo soy protein for wraps and an Indo-Chinese version with that same protein spiced differently. The traditional masala dosa utilizes gunpowder pepper, a nice blast of heat with potato curry and coconut chtuney.

A dosa with sambar, potatoes, pickles, and more. Revival Food Hall

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There are plenty of tempting stands inside the food court at Mitsuwa, the Chicago area’s premiere Japanese market in suburban Arlington Heights, including Japanese-style crepe specialist B-Bee Crepe & Umacha. Though Japanese crepes are strikingly similar to their French counterparts, the primary difference is presentation — in Japan, they’re rolled into cones and stuffed with sweets like pudding, whipped cream, Nutella, and ice cream. B-Bee’s menu includes flavors like taro, matcha, almond banana, and more.

A rare non-Filipino spot inside Seafood City, Serbian-owned Crepe House Cafe has carved out a niche with massive sweet and savory European crepes with distinctive cultural nods. Try the berry-loaded Queen Berry, which comes with a choice of Nutella or Eurocrem, a Serbian sweet chocolate spread; or the Bananarama, which is dusted with crumbled Plazma cookies, another Serbian favorite.

Jianbing, a Chinese cousin of the crepe and one of the country’s most popular street breakfast foods, has made its way to suburban Chicago. Previously located in Chinatown, Monkey King Jianbing recently moved to Skokie and brought with it a tight menu of crispy, savory pancakes that are grilled on a flat top, slathered in sauce, and filled with ingredients (think meat floss with beef hot dogs, fried shrimp, or crab stick with ham). The pancakes are then delicately rolled on the grill before chefs stab its center with a spatula and fold the whole thing in half.

A perpetually heaving breakfast destination in Little Village, La Catedral has in recent years expanded into a mini-empire with outposts in North Lawndale and Brighton Park. Owner Ambrocio “Bocho” González generally puts the spotlight on his vast and varied selection of chilaquiles, but regulars and fans know that toward the back of the menu lies a wonderland of sweet crepes, all served with powdered sugar and whipped cream. Highlights include dulce de leche with banana and strawberry mango.

A round white plate with a sweet strawberry Nutella crepe topped with whipped cream.
Sweet-toothed diners have lots of crepe options at La Catedral.
Kim Kovacik/Eater Chicago

Bixi Beer, named for the Chinese turtle serpent, counts several Asian influences on an eclectic menu. The rice crepe draws mostly Vietnamese influences and comes with a choice of mushrooms, pork, or shrimp. The quality of produce is what makes this version stick out and the veggies are always crisp and the herbs used in the nuoc cham make the sauce vibrant.

This indie coffeehouse is arguably best known for its empanadas — mainstays at owners Carmen Aguilar and Claudia Quiñonez’s respective households while growing up — but fans also rave about its indulgent crepes. Sweet varieties include banana or strawberry with Nutella, or customers can opt for a savory crepe stuffed with turkey, pesto, and mozzarella.

Marlen Alchinov and Aigerim Mambetova, the spouses and owners behind this cozy cafe and bakery in Ravenswood, bring a Central Asian lilt to Chicago’s crepe scene — to great effect. The couple immigrated in 2013 from Kyrgyzstan and their roots are evident throughout the menu, including among its selection of sweet and savory crepes. Standouts include halal ground beef crepes with rice, cherry tomatoes, greens, and sour cream; and “classic crepes” slathered with condensed milk and strawberry jam made on-site.

Gluten-free diners don’t have to miss out on the fun of crepes at Bru, a cozy neighborhood cafe that specializes in rice crepes shaped into a cone and stuffed with ingredients like spicy beef, blue cheese with mushrooms, and banana with Nutella. The team has also added vegan options including tofu teriyaki and dairy-free strawberry Biscoff.

Originally founded in 1998 in Sparta, Greece, Iguana Cafe relocated to Chicago in 2000 and has proudly highlighted its European roots. The all-day spot goes so far as to feature different selections of sweet and savory crepes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Savory crepes are named after European locations or cities — think the Acropolis (feta, tomato, red onion) and the Berlin (turkey, provolone, onion, avocado). Sugary dessert crepes include a spin on a cannoli with chocolate chips and the Chocolate Delight with Nutella and Oreos.

Founded in 1972, local French favorite La Creperie is not only the granddaddy of Chicago crepe shops — its owners claim it’s the oldest restaurant of its kind in the U.S. The charming storefront spot has endured for various reasons, including its often-bustling beer garden, but most particularly due to its lengthy menu. Chicagoans continue to beat a path to its door for crepe hits like Boeuf bourguignon, fruits de mer with bechamel, and La Pomme, which features apples sautéed in butter and cinnamon.

As its name makes clear, it’s all crepes all the time at this Lakeview cafe that embraces classic, crowd-pleasing combinations. It’s hard to go wrong with its nostalgic lineup of delicate pancake treats, which range from Black Forest ham and fontina (mornay, dijon) and Fromage a Trois (fontina, mozzarella, mornay, parmesan crust) to cookie-inspired Biscoff and Matcha Made in Heaven (strawberries, mascarpone, jasmine, pistachios).

Jianbing finally hit Chicago’s hospitality scene in 2019 with the arrival of Jian inside the Chicago French Market. That’s where many locals encountered the Chinese crepes for the first time, gobbling up options like smoked bacon with avocado and cheddar, crawfish, and coconut butterfly shrimp. In late 2023, Jian opened a second outpost inside the Loop’s Block 37 mall.

Obelix’s weekday lunch and brunch menus contain a decadent crepe homard. The vegetables swimming in the buttery sauce change, but the main event is the poached lobster filling. It’s even better than it looks, and it looks pretty good.

This Chicago staple, with locations in the city and North Shore, is a throwback to the ‘70s with all-day breakfast vibes. There are two savory flavors with diced chicken breast or spinach, but the rest are filled with fruit. The nutty banana is reliable.

Dolo is one the finest restaurants in Chinatown, serving some of the city’s best dim sum. The traditional crepes come stuffed with shrimp, barbecue pork, beef, Japanese tofu, or pea spout and scrambled egg. It’s a very good version of the crepe with a slippery and chewy exterior.

This will start an argument. Is a dosa, the South Indian specialty, a crepe? Owner Ravi Nagubadi cringes when he reads the description. A dosa can be done in several ways, from paper thing crispy to fluffy. In between lies the possibility that dosas could be crepes. Art of Dosa inside Revival Food Hall deals with dosa fusion. The all-vegan spot uses Buffalo soy protein for wraps and an Indo-Chinese version with that same protein spiced differently. The traditional masala dosa utilizes gunpowder pepper, a nice blast of heat with potato curry and coconut chtuney.

A dosa with sambar, potatoes, pickles, and more. Revival Food Hall

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